Trekking.

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Getting started

The Himalayas (literally “abode of snow” in Sanskrit) are sacred to three of the world’s major religions – four if you include mountaineering as a faith. These snow-capped mountains have pulled explorers under their spell for centuries, promising an ever-changing landscape of remote villages, thick alpine forests, and rushing rivers set against the otherworldly backdrop of peaks that scrape the belly of heaven itself. Prepare to be astounded.

   

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Weather Conditions

Most likely. The air in the Himalayas contains less breathable oxygen than what you’re used to at sea level. Everyone will experience the thinner high-altitude air a little differently – and some more than others – slow and steady is always the best way to go. The more time you give yourself to acclimatize, the better you’ll feel and the easier your day’s trekking will be

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Where do we stay.?

Be sure to research the type of accommodation available on your trek before embarking. Tea Houses (Lodges) at settlements at various points on the trek offer dorm room accommodation and simple basic meals reflective of what the local people in the area eat. Although many tea houses and hotels in the hills and mountains are reasonably comfortable, some may be dirty and rather basic. In areas where chimneys are rare, dining rooms may be smoky. Bedrooms and dorm rooms will not be heated. Note that linens are not provided by the lodges, and nights can get very cold, so it makes sense to bring a sleeping bag even for teahouse treks. Camping can be conducted almost anywhere in the country. Camping treks can be fully organized and supported with a team of guides (who may or may not be Sherpas), cooks, and porters to accompany you. Homestays in local villages can be organized.

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